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Aug 19

Creating a Safe Play Area for Your Baby

Every baby has, more or less, the same requirements while growing up, and one such that most parents ignore is independence. Now, I know what you’re thinking, nobody envisages a baby to be independent – that phase doesn’t come till late teenage, right? Wrong. It may seem hard to believe, but it is important for babies to have their “own space”.

Play ground designs require a fair bit of imagination, but safety should never be compromised and should be of foremost concern. The best bet would be to invest in commercial playground equipment. So, to keep a baby happy (and safe) we have to start thinking like one. Use common sense to dictate the guidelines for your baby’s play ground.

1. The play area should be located in an area of the house where you can supervise your child easily.

2. Play ground should, ideally, be away from the stairs. But in case if it has to be near one, a gate should be installed at the top and bottom of the stairs to prevent any accidents. To avoid your child climbing banisters, you can buy and install a transparent, durable, and shatterproof plastic shield.

3. Utilizing natural light is incredibly important. Play areas should be sunny and bright. But despite this fact, play areas shouldn’t be near windows. And especially away from the cords on blinds.

4. Babies are curious little devils, and their curiosity might get the better of them when around electric outlets. Best to keep them covered with socket covers.

5. Children, while still learning and getting accustomed to their surroundings, frequently put foreign objects into their mouths. These not-so-delightful habits could be possible sources of infection, so to avoid this play ground and outdoor playground equipment need to be clean and hygienic.

6. And since toddlers topple every now and then, when trying to walk, you have to make sure that the surface they fall on is smooth and soft. Padding or using foam padding is a sure way of ensuring this.

7. Age limits on children’s toys are there for a reason and shouldn’t be disregarded. Toys with small parts can be choking hazards and so can toys with moving parts that could be dislodged.